Looking at the Planetary Past to Prepare for Our Climate Changed Future—An Interview with Steven Earle

Post Carbon Institute Senior Fellow and author Richard Heinberg interviews Steven Earle, PhD, author of Runaway Climate: What the Geological Past Can Tell Us about the Coming Climate Change Catastrophe. Steven shares with Richard what we can learn from events in our planet’s history – particularly the rapid global temperature increase of about 7ºC roughly 56 million years ago – to better understand and prepare for a rapidly unraveling climate system.

The Kids Aren’t Alright

Journalist and podcaster Rachel Donald (Planet: Critical) interviews Caroline Hickman, a practicing psychotherapist and researcher who focuses on eco-anxiety, especially in young people. Caroline defines eco-anxiety, explains how it’s natural to feel distress if you care about the state of the environment, covers how to communicate with others about eco-anxiety, and suggests ways to move through feelings of anger and despair to achieve emotional resilience.

Navigating Climate Catastrophe: Part 2 – The Response

People have all sorts of different interpretations on what’s happening with climate change. While some are practicing denial or willful ignorance, even those following the science can be confused. After all, Earth’s climate system is complex. In Part 2, Richard Heinberg unpacks some recent research on the likely consequences of global warming this century and beyond and recommends practical things we can do to both mitigate and adapt to the consequences. (See part 1, in case you missed it.)

Navigating Climate Catastrophe: Part 1 – The Predicament

People have all sorts of different interpretations on what’s happening with climate change. While some are practicing denial or willful ignorance, even those following the science can be confused. After all, Earth’s climate system is complex. In Part 1 of this two-part article, Richard Heinberg cuts through this complexity by putting climate change into the context of humanity’s energy history.

How Do We Respond to Climate Destabilization?

Responding to the rapidly unfolding climate crisis – especially in the context of a broader unraveling of environmental and social systems – requires courage, care, and grappling with difficult questions and choices. It also demands clarity about what we face, including the implications of already locked-in warming and probable pathways, and an openness to new … Read more

How in the World Are People Doing?

Journalist and podcaster Rachel Donald (Planet: Critical) interviews Dr. Omnia El Omrani, a medical doctor and Climate and Health Policy Fellow at Imperial College London. Omnia shares reflections on Connecting Climate Minds—a landmark project looking at climate and mental health across the globe, with a specific focus on the lived experiences of youth, Indigenous communities, small farmers and fisher people.

Video: Welcome to the Great Unraveling

On May 14, 2024 Resilience hosted “Welcome to the Great Unraveling,” an hour-long online discussion featuring Dr. Lyla June Johnston and Kumi Naidoo, and facilitated by Post Carbon Institute’s Asher Miller. This event was an introduction to our new Resilience+ Deep Dives, a series of events and curated materials that can help anyone better understand important aspects of the climate crisis.

Discussion Session: Exploring Personal and Collective Responses to Climate Unraveling

Post Carbon Institute Executive Director Asher Miller is joined by Prof. Kimberly Nicholas, sustainability scientist, writer, speaker, and author of the Los Angeles Times bestseller UNDER THE SKY WE MAKE: How to be Human in a Warming World and the climate advice newsletter We Can Fix It to explore ways of reducing or sequestering greenhouse … Read more

Going Sane in a Crazy World

Individual psychological resilience is valuable for its own sake. But it may also be essential to the bigger and more important project of creating a human world that’s actually sane—i.e., one that serves the long-term survival of our species within a healthy ecosphere.

Research on Psychological Effects of Natural Disasters

The need to address mental health in response to the climate crisis (and related calamities) is not new. In his 2007 book Peak Everything, Richard Heinberg described important research findings on how people respond in the aftermath of disasters, such as drought, famine, and societal collapse. The research he presented is all the more relevant today, given how industrial societies have failed to reverse overshoot.