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What you're telling us

Thanks to all the readers (1470 of you!) who recently completed our Resilience.org survey. The results have been very useful in getting a better picture of how readers are using Resilience.org, and how the structure is working.  It has been very helpful to read your specific feedback, so thanks for all comments – the praise, the suggestions, and the criticism. All are essential to keep us on our toes.

Here is a summary of what we learned:

• You come to us for information, and 85% of you feel informed, motivated, and/or inspired as a result of reading Resilience.org.
 
• You’re looking for interesting, reliable content. There is an even split between wanting more information on the issues, and wanting information on responses to these issues. The important thing is that it is strong content.
 
• Only 1.7% of you are confused by the site.
 
• Although 3% are depressed, this is mostly due to the state of the world, not the state of the site.
 
• Of respondents who visited the Resilience.org’s predecessor (Energy Bulletin) 83% find the content on Resilience.org either more comprehensive, more useful or about the same, compared to the old site. There were a good number of comments from readers who still miss the look and layout of Energy Bulletin.
 
• New users have gathered since we launched Resilience.org: 30% of respondents had not previously visited to Energy Bulletin.
 
• Only a minority of respondents had so far found their way to the Groups and Resources sections of the site. On balance, respondents found the Resources section more useful than the Groups.
 
• It was great to see that 40% of you are involved in community resilience building, with an additional 20% wishing for such a group in your area.
 
• We were also excited to find that 33% of respondents had been inspired to take action as a result of reading Resilience.org.
 
• Just under half of respondents share Resilience.org content via social media or email. Where you do share, Facebook is the most popular method, although much of the sharing goes on via direct personal recommendations in email.
 
Thanks again for the many comments, which are much more difficult to summarize. Be assured that all the Resilience.org editors and advisors have read and discussed all of the findings, including the comments and will consider them as we evolve the site. We hope you will continue to follow Resilience.org.
 
The editors
 
Feedback image via shutterstock. Reproduced at Resilience.org with permission

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