Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

What does the “American Dream” mean today?

What does the “American Dream” mean today? How—and how successfully—are Americans achieving this dream? How has the concept of the “American Dream” shifted over the past 10 years? 

These questions are at the heart of the Center for a New American Dream's 2014 national survey, conducted in partnership with PolicyInteractive.
The survey, which polled 1,821 U.S. citizens ages 18 and over, illustrates the shift in public consciousness around the topic of the American Dream and sheds new light on the topics of advertising, the environment, consumption, and the sharing economy.

Major findings include:
1. The majority of Americans believe that it is more difficult to achieve the American Dream than it was a decade ago, due primarily to the high costs of education and healthcare.
 
2. Americans who have chosen to work fewer hours report an overall improvement in quality of life, indicating that this shift has positively affected their lives by allowing for more free time and reduced stress.
 
3. Americans are interested in increasing their sharing practices and learning more about the sharing economy. Over half of respondents believe that sharing lowers environmental impact, builds community, and helps save money.
 
4. Americans feel strongly that the way we live produces too much waste, and that our high consumption levels are largely responsible for global environmental problems. An overwhelming majority feel that we will need to make major changes in the way we live to counterbalance this phenomenon.
 
5. Americans believe that commercialism and advertising have gotten out of hand in the United States, and that the government should do more to combat it. Almost three-quarters of Americans believe there should be limits on advertising to children, including limits on advertising in public spaces and in schools.
 
6. Millennials make use of sharing economy services—such as bike sharing and peer-to-peer lodging—at a rate more than double their Baby Boomer and Gen X peers, and are interested in expanding their sharing practices. They are also more optimistic than Baby Boomers and Gen Xers that they will be able to achieve the American Dream.
 
7. Non-white Americans are more interested in sharing practices than white Americans.
 
Click on each infographic for a larger view. See also the final analysis report, the full survey results, and thesurvey methodology

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


Ssa to Seed 2015 – A Sailboat Tour of Farming, Music, and Resilient Culture

And it appears that the islands of the Coast Salish Sea, recognizing that …

Resilience Reflections with Claire Schosser

Resilience means having backup systems in place in case the primary systems …

Community Engagement and Transition Principles

Ultimately, generosity attracts more interest than self-interest. Respect, …

How the ‘Paddle in Seattle’ Plans to Beat Shell

Seattle has become a hub of anti-extraction activism.

In Defence of Wellbeing

William Davies’ new book The Happiness Industry is a fascinating and …

The Era of Impact

The era of impact is the point at which it becomes clear to most people that …

NACTO Report Links Station Density to Bike Share Usage, Equity

A new report argues that consistent, close station design is crucial to …