Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

Transforming Neighborhoods Through Guerrilla Gardening

Imagine what your community would look like if the vacant lots, patches of half-dead, boring old lawn, and sidewalk beds were thriving, beautiful gardens filled with veggies, flowers and herbs. Doesn't that sound nice? Want to get involved with making it happen? Welcome to the world of guerrilla gardening.

The practice of planting on land that does not legally belong to you, guerrilla gardening is, on the one hand, not as rebellious as its name suggests. We’re talking about introducing seeds and plants to neglected land; a pretty harmless act. On the other hand, however, a guerrilla garden can radically transform a junky lot full of trash into the showpiece of a neighborhood. It can provide food, create beauty where there was none, draw attention to areas that need cleanup and bring a community closer together. In times of isolation and concrete over-growth, this really is an act of revolution. Not bad for a few little plants, eh?

If you want to see neighborhood transformation in action, check out this video. In it, South Central L.A. guerrilla gardener Ron Finley shares his approach to guerrilla gardening and his thoughts on why community gardens are essential. Below the video is a short photo essay of guerrilla gardens to inspire you.

Guerrilla Gardening Photo Essay


Pop-up corn field in the middle of a busy Bronx intersection. Creative Commons photo by Kristine Paulus


Guerrilla Gardener in Belgium. Creative Commons photo by mathiasbaert


Guerrilla Gardening Meets Street Art in Newtown, New South Wales. Creative Commons photo by Newtown Graffiti


Seed Bomb Ready to be Tossed Into a Vacant Lot. Get more info on seed balls/bombs here. Creative Commons photo by Herder3


A Guerrilla Garden of Strawberries. Yum! Creative Commons photo by ubrayj02


Pansies Brighten Up a Vacant Lot in Edinburgh North, U.K.. Creative Commons photo by Denna Jones


A sandbox in Quebec is reimagined as a guerrilla garden. Creative Commons photo by solylunafamilia


Creating a moss art garden in Berlin. Learn how to create moss art here. Creative Commons photo by rosalux-stiftung.

Follow Cat Johnson on Twitter

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Make connections via our GROUPS page.
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.


Young Agrarians

At its best the agrarian life is an integrated whole, with work and leisure …

Community Food Activists Tell Their Stories

It’s easy to dismiss issues facing people we don’t know and …

The Energetic Basis of Wealth

Last year I did an analysis to try to understand whether it’s possible …

During extreme drought, farmers try for resiliency

For those who take the long view, there are bigger ideas to achieve …

Crowdfunding and Ownership in the Sharing Economy

What would...our sensibilities regain, if sustainable local food projects …

Why we need a farmer-led food movement

Long Island seaweed and shellfish farmer Bren Smith warned parents in a …

An open letter to George Monbiot

Influenced by the ideas of Allan Savory and other advocates of holistic …