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Taking Practical Action Toward Resilience

Dreaming, organizing, and awareness raising are all important parts of the work we do, but there is something to be said for bringing people together, getting your hands dirty, and creating something beautiful. As we heard in last month's teleseminar with Rob Hopkins, practical projects are one of the most fun and effective ways to energize and strengthen your existing Transition groups and reach out to inspire and engage your community.

Whether you’re procrastinating on an energy-saving DIY project or can’t wait to start a community garden, now is the time to call up a few friends and get ready to take action. Why now? Because we've got the perfect excuse for you - the 2013 Transition Challenge.

During the month of May, join thousands of people across the country taking action to build community resilience, enhance local food systems, and reduce energy and water consumption through the Transition Challenge. By joining the challenge, you'll not only see the benefits to your own home and community, but also be counted as part of a bigger movement toward community resilience in the face of climate change and peak oil.

Last year, in partnership with California-based Daily Acts, we registered over 4,000 actions in communities across the country. Folks picked up their shovels and tools, helped construct rainwater harvesting systems, and installed solar panels. Abandoned lots were converted into green oases and school children pulled weeds and planted tomato starts. When these individual actions occur on a large scale, they energize and engage our communities and show the world what is possible.

To participate in this year's challenge, you can create your own project or volunteer on a community project in one of four areas: food, water, energy, and community. We have plenty of ideas and how-to guides listed on the Transition Challenge page, but the sky is the limit. Whether your “something beautiful” takes the form of a community garden, a compost pile, or even a graywater system, it brings us one step closer to a healthy, resilient planet.

For more ideas and inspiration, mark your calendar for our upcoming teleseminar on “Tools and Tips for the Transition Challenge” with Trathen Heckman, the force behind the hugely successful 350 Challenge in Sonoma County, CA, on April 25th. Make sure to register your project to be counted, and feel free to send us updates and photos to share and inspire others with your ideas!

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