Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

Waste & recycling - Oct 1

Click on the headline (link) for the full text.

Many more articles are available through the Energy Bulletin homepage.


On donating, buying, and swapping secondhand clothes

Umbra Fisk, Grist
... Secondhand threads are among the most fashionable and eco-friendly garments. They embody one of the three R’s: Reuse. In so doing, they save resources, including that precious green resource -- cash.

But not all secondhand clothing options are created equal. Because clothes are valuable, there’s a significant economy around secondhand wear. Like many moneymakers, used clothes have gone global. According to the Council for Textile Recycling, about 61 percent of donated clothes are exported to other countries.

This poses a few conundrums. Shipping more than half of the 2.5 billion pounds of post-consumer textile product waste, aka used clothes, each year to far away places can have a sizable carbon (and cotton and polyester) footprint. Your old discarded "Another Day, Another Doughnut" shirt may make its way across oceans. When it reaches its destination, it will probably clothe someone. But chances are it will also have a suffocating impact on local textile businesses. For more on that troubling t-shirt, check out The Root piece entitled "Dead white people’s clothes: How the used clothes you send to Africa are killing the local textile industries."
(27 September 2010)



Compostable diaper service

Carolyn Said, San Francisco Chronicle
Babies poop. Most parents use disposable diapers. Dirty diapers clog landfills.

In fact, about 3.4 million tons of used diapers end up in U.S. landfills every year, according to the Environmental Protection Agency.

A Sunnyvale startup has a greener idea: compostable diapers.

EarthBaby has signed up almost 1,000 Bay Area families for its service, which includes weekly drop-offs of diapers made out of substances derived from corn and wood, and pickups of soiled diapers, which decompose into topsoil within a few months.
(28 September 2010)



UN environment chief urges recycling of rare metals

AFP
GENEVA — The UN's environment chief on Wednesday called for a global drive to recycle rare metals that have hit the headlines in a spat between Japan and China, warning that they are crucial for green technologies.

Achim Steiner, executive director of the UN Environment Programme, said that demand for "rare earth metals" such as lithium and neodymium -- used in batteries for hybrid cars or components in wind and solar power -- was accelerating fast.

Rare earths are available in only small quantities and mined in a few locations, raising fears that global supply for a clean, high-tech economy could be exhausted swiftly as well as hampered by geopolitical disputes.
(29 September 2010)

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


Film Review: ‘Qu’est-ce qu’on attend?‘ (‘What are we waiting for?’)

In which we review ‘Qu’est-ce qu’on attend?‘, …

The Real Standing Rock Victory Is This: “Inevitable” Is Not What It Used to Be

The Standing Rock Sioux Tribe has defied history.

Who's afraid of a recount?

In a country where politicians and other civic leaders constantly tell us …

Decolonisation in Europe: Sámi Musician Sofia Jannok Points to Life beyond Colonialism

I was able to interview Sofia Jannok to explore the connection between her …

Where Citizens Can Run for Office Without Big Money—and Win

State representative Joyce McCreight never thought she would run for office.

The Beginning is Near: The Deep North, Evictions and Pipeline Deadlines

Standing Rock is an unpredicted history lesson for all of us.

Is America Ready for a Municipalist Movement?

The mass protests across the United States in response to Donald …