Building a world of
resilient communities.



Peak oil - August 5

Click on the headline (link) for the full text.

Many more articles are available through the Energy Bulletin homepage

Mainstream Dutch analysts foresee oil supply constrained world

Rembrandt, The Oil Drum: Europe
An important Dutch energy institute, the Clingendael International Energy Program (CIEP), recently published a report that confirms most of the conclusions about the oil market reached over the years at the oildrum.

That the floor price of oil is now 110 dollars per barrel, that supply will not rise beyond 100-105 million b/d in the coming decades, that there will be an oil supply constraint for most of the next decade, that there are insufficient quantities of alternative fuels available and that thus demand destruction is inevitable.

CIEP is especially important because it is endorsed by amongst others BP, Shell Netherlands, Total E&P Netherlands, three Dutch Ministries, Wintershall, Vopak Oil Europe Middle East and several Dutch energy companies. The report in english can be downloaded here (PDF 2.8 megabytes, 108 pages).
(30 July 2008)

A visit to Malaysia

Big Gav, The Oil Drum: Australia/New Zealand
I spent a week in Malaysia back in June, loafing about in the sun on the island of Langkawi. While I mostly tried to ignore the news flow, I did read the local paper each day and there seemed to be plenty of energy related stories on the boil. These ranged from prominent exposure of the global "energy and food crises" to more locally focused issues, which I'll take a look at in this post.


Tourism is Malaysia's third largest foreign exchange earner after manufactured goods and palm oil, so rising fuel prices are likely to crimp the local economy (although palm oil exports would seem likely to offset the impact on the other 2 sectors).

This was borne out anecdotally during my visit, as the resort driver who took us to the airport at the end of our visit noted that off season was much quieter than normal, with a occupancy rate of around 30% compared to the usual 50%, which he blamed on the rising price of oil. This doesn't seem to be reflected in overall visitor numbers so far though, so perhaps it is just the higher-end resorts that are being impacted so far.
(3 August 2008)

Deep Green: peak oil changes everything

Rex Weyler, Greenpeace UK
Here's the latest in the Deep Green column from Rex Weyler - author, journalist, ecologist and long-time Greenpeace trouble-maker. The opinions here are his own.

As the era of cheap liquid fuels draws to an end, everything about modern consumer society will change. Likewise, developing societies pursuing the benefits of globalization will struggle to grow economies in an era of scarce liquid fuels. The most localized, self-reliant communities will experience the least disruption.
(4 August 2008)

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.


This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.

For Storing Electricity, Utilities Are Turning to Pumped Hydro

But utilities from Spain to China are increasingly relying on pumped storage …

Peak Oil Review - Nov 30

 A weekly update, including:-Quote of the Week -Oil and the Global …

Peak Oil Notes - Nov 27

A midweek roundup. There has been a lot of news to move the oil markets in …

The "Syrian Sickness": What Crude Oil Gives, Crude Oil will Take Away

Crude oil had created modern Syria, crude oil has destroyed it.

Drought Influenced Syrian Civil War; So What, Says U.S. Congress

This singular thought, that climate change can stir dangerous human …

Peak Oil Review - Nov 23

A weekly roundup of peak oil news, including: -Quote of the Week -Oil and …

Despite Low Oil Prices, Renewable Power Gaining Traction, Energy Agencies Report — But Not Yet Fast Enough for the Climate

The shift away from coal and towards renewable sources of energy is slowly …