Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

IEA reviews reliance on USGS resource estimates

[Excerpt]: IEA chief economist Fatih Birol has told lastoilshock.com that the agency will review its use of resource estimates from the United States Geological Survey, in a move that seems certain to prompt a major downward revision of its long term oil production forecast.

 Amid a growing consensus that global oil production will peak by around the end of this decade, the International Energy Agency’s forecast that world output will reach 116 million barrels per day in 2030 has looked increasingly isolated, particularly now that its latest Medium Term Oil Market Report - produced by a separate forecasting team - predicts an oil “supply crunch” in 2012...

To listen to the interview with Fatih Birol, [go to the link at the bottom of the original article.]

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Make connections via our GROUPS page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.

Tags:  

Energy Crunch: a clean energy revolution?

Will 2015 prove to be a tipping point in the journey to a zero carbon energy …

With Corporate Energy, We're Stuck in the Dark Ages – Let's Switch to Public Ownership

It is clear that Britain has an energy problem.

Peak Oil Notes - Mar 5

A midweek update. Oil prices have been volatile this week as traders attempt …

The Paradox of Oil: The Cheaper it is, the More it Costs

While the exact timing of the current fall in prices may have come as a …

Stranded Assets in Oil and Gas a Reality

Though climate change will no doubt prove to be one aspect of stranded …

IEA report: US shale oil growth practically zero in 2017

US growth is seen to decline to a meagre 160 kb/d by 2017. That is plausible …

Richard Heinberg on Our Renewable Future

Richard Heinberg discusses our renewable future and how to get there.