Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

Argentine homes save on gas, electricity to meet energy crisis.

The Argentine government on Friday said that in the first six months of the year a plan to reduce household energy consumption yielded savings of 8 percent on domestic gas and 3 percent on electricity, which were used to supply growing industrial demand.

At a press conference, Federal Planning Minister Julio de Vido expressed the government's "extreme satisfaction" at the highly positive results obtained from the plan, launched April 28 following an energy crisis brought on by gas shortages.

Energy Secretary Daniel Cameron said domestic gas consumption met the government objective by dropping 8 percent in the first half of 2004. Household electricity consumption fell 3 percent, he said.

The rationing scheme gives discounts to clients who reduce their gas and electricity consumption, while charging an additional tariff to those consuming more energy than the previous year.

In the first six months the plan gave discounts to some 400,000 clients while imposing extra charges on about 200,000.

De Vido said the energy savings allowed the industrial sector a 15 percent increase in gas consumption and a 10 percent increase in electricity use, which were applied to rising manufacturing activity.

Nevertheless, De Vido said Argentina will continue importing natural gas from Bolivia and fuel from Venezuela, two emergency measures adopted after the energy crisis. To alleviate the gas shortage, Argentina also rationed gas exports to Chile in late March and decided to import electricity from Brazil.

The National Statistics and Census Institute reported Friday that generation of electricity grew 10.7 percent in the first six months this year compared to the same period in 2003, while natural gas production rose by 9.3 percent.

Editorial Notes: Some good results for Argentina in encouraging energy conservation, but feeding all the gains into industry and manufacturing suggests the government doesn't 'get' depletion quite yet.

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


Peak Oil Review: A Midweek Update - 28th July 2016

 A midweek update. Oil prices continued to fall this week as crude …

Thoughts on Significance of Solar Impulse as it Finishes Epic Round-the-World Trip

My interview on BBC World Service Newshour: the heroism of the adventurer …

An Industrial Strategy for Energy

What’s also clear is that while nuclear power is tending to get more …

South Australia’s Electricity Price Woes are more Due to Gas than Wind

The past few weeks have seen extraordinarily high wholesale electricity …

Former Inspectors Describe Dangerous Flaws in Construction of Major East Coast Gas Pipeline

In April, a massive explosion ripped through rural Salem Township, …

Northwest Tribes Band Together to Stop Oil-by-Rail

There’s no such thing as a good place for an oil-train derailment, but …

The Role of Development Banks in Energy Transition  

Multilateral Development Banks (MDBs) like the World Bank, the African …