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Fracking headlines

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More Fracking Headaches As Earthquake Evidence Grows

Tina Casey, Cleantechnica
It looks like more trouble is looming ahead for communities that host fracking operations. Two new studies have linked fracking-related operations to earthquakes in Texas and Ohio, and a recently settled lawsuit in Arkansas indicates that swarms of tiny earthquakes can damage surface structures. Add earthquakes to a list that already includes water contamination and air pollution risks, and it becomes clear that a more effective regulatory platform is needed to protect existing communities from the impacts of fracking...

Though the drilling operation itself would seem to be the most likely cause of earthquakes, so far the main culprit appears to be the disposal of wastewater from fracking operations, which is commonly injected into existing wells. The largest earthquake ever recorded in Oklahoma, for example, has been linked to fracking wastewater disposal in an injection well, and last year Columbia University seismologists linked a series of about a dozen strong earthquakes in Youngstown, Ohio to a similar operation...
(5 September 2013)


"Frackademia" By Law: Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Exposed

Steve Horn, DeSmogBlog

"Frackademia" By Law: Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Exposed (via Desmogblog)

With the school year starting for many this week, it's another year of academia for professors across the United States - and another year of "frackademia" for an increasingly large swath of "frackademics" under federal law. "Frackademia" is best…



(3 September 2013)


'Baseless economics': Lord Stern on David Cameron’s claims that a UK fracking boom can bring down price of gas

Tom Bawden, The Independent
Lord Stern, author of the hugely influential Stern review on the financial implications of climate change, has dismissed David Cameron’s claims that a fracking boom in the UK can bring down the price of gas in the UK as “baseless”.

In an interview with The Independent, the respected economist said he was puzzled by the prime minister’s claim this month that “fracking has real potential to drive energy bills down… gas and electric bills can go down when our home-grown energy supply goes up”.

“I do think it’s a bit odd to say you know that it will bring the price of gas down. That doesn’t look like sound economics to me. It’s baseless economics,” said Lord Stern, chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change at the London School of Economics...
(3 September 2013)


Fracking brings climate debate closer to home

George Monbiot, The Guardian
Many of those who deny that climate change is taking place reached that position as a result of their opposition to windfarms. This, for example, was the route taken by David Bellamy, who stumbled disastrously into the debate a decade ago.

During one of our discussions, he set me the following challenge:

"Why are the so-called greens backing a cartel of multinational companies which are hell bent on covering some of the best of our countryside with so-called windfarms, which can neither provide us with a sustainable source of future energy nor have any measurable effect reducing the amount of carbon dioxide pouring into the atmosphere? If he [George Monbiot] can disprove the latter – which is the mathematical truth – I will fall into line over global warming".

In other words, if I could disprove his contention that windfarms are useless, he would accept climate change science.

So perhaps we should thank the fracking companies for bringing fossil fuel infrastructure to people's doorsteps. If people's dislike of low-carbon power production drives them to reject climate science, their dislike of high-carbon power production could drive them to accept it.

For the first time in decades, prosperous, well-connected people in this country are having to face the reality of fossil fuel extraction, and they don't like it one bit.
(30 August 2013)

Click on the headline (link) for the full text.

More Fracking Headaches As Earthquake Evidence Grows

Tina Casey, Cleantechnica
It looks like more trouble is looming ahead for communities that host fracking operations. Two new studies have linked fracking-related operations to earthquakes in Texas and Ohio, and a recently settled lawsuit in Arkansas indicates that swarms of tiny earthquakes can damage surface structures. Add earthquakes to a list that already includes water contamination and air pollution risks, and it becomes clear that a more effective regulatory platform is needed to protect existing communities from the impacts of fracking...

Though the drilling operation itself would seem to be the most likely cause of earthquakes, so far the main culprit appears to be the disposal of wastewater from fracking operations, which is commonly injected into existing wells. The largest earthquake ever recorded in Oklahoma, for example, has been linked to fracking wastewater disposal in an injection well, and last year Columbia University seismologists linked a series of about a dozen strong earthquakes in Youngstown, Ohio to a similar operation...
(5 September 2013)


"Frackademia" By Law: Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Exposed

Steve Horn, DeSmogBlog

"Frackademia" By Law: Section 999 of the Energy Policy Act of 2005 Exposed (via Desmogblog)

With the school year starting for many this week, it's another year of academia for professors across the United States - and another year of "frackademia" for an increasingly large swath of "frackademics" under federal law. "Frackademia" is best…



(3 September 2013)


'Baseless economics': Lord Stern on David Cameron’s claims that a UK fracking boom can bring down price of gas

Tom Bawden, The Independent
Lord Stern, author of the hugely influential Stern review on the financial implications of climate change, has dismissed David Cameron’s claims that a fracking boom in the UK can bring down the price of gas in the UK as “baseless”.

In an interview with The Independent, the respected economist said he was puzzled by the prime minister’s claim this month that “fracking has real potential to drive energy bills down… gas and electric bills can go down when our home-grown energy supply goes up”.

“I do think it’s a bit odd to say you know that it will bring the price of gas down. That doesn’t look like sound economics to me. It’s baseless economics,” said Lord Stern, chair of the Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change at the London School of Economics...
(3 September 2013)


Fracking brings climate debate closer to home

George Monbiot, The Guardian
Many of those who deny that climate change is taking place reached that position as a result of their opposition to windfarms. This, for example, was the route taken by David Bellamy, who stumbled disastrously into the debate a decade ago.

During one of our discussions, he set me the following challenge:

"Why are the so-called greens backing a cartel of multinational companies which are hell bent on covering some of the best of our countryside with so-called windfarms, which can neither provide us with a sustainable source of future energy nor have any measurable effect reducing the amount of carbon dioxide pouring into the atmosphere? If he [George Monbiot] can disprove the latter – which is the mathematical truth – I will fall into line over global warming".

In other words, if I could disprove his contention that windfarms are useless, he would accept climate change science.

So perhaps we should thank the fracking companies for bringing fossil fuel infrastructure to people's doorsteps. If people's dislike of low-carbon power production drives them to reject climate science, their dislike of high-carbon power production could drive them to accept it.

For the first time in decades, prosperous, well-connected people in this country are having to face the reality of fossil fuel extraction, and they don't like it one bit.
(30 August 2013)


U.K.’s Davey Warns of Hype Over Shale Gas Benefits, Times Says

Thomas Penny, Bloomberg
U.K. Energy Secretary Ed Davey will warn of “hype” over the benefits of fracking for shale gas in a speech tomorrow, The Sunday Times reported.

Davey, who is a member of the Liberal Democrat junior partners in Prime Minister David Cameron’s coalition government, will say the benefits won’t be felt until 2020 and can’t be at the expense of environmental protection, according to the newspaper...
(8 September 2013)


Fracking won't endanger UK's climate targets, says Ed Davey

Adam Vaughan, The Guardian
Fracking for shale gas is not a "great evil" and can act as a bridge to a "green future" in the UK as long as it is properly regulated, according to the energy and climate secretary Ed Davey.

In a major speech in defence of exploiting domestic shale gas he said that Britain can extract the gas without endangering the country's climate targets.

But the energy and climate secretary's comments were accompanied by a warning in a report from his department's chief scientist that exploiting shale gas in the UK will cause global greenhouse gas emissions to rise without an international deal on climate change.

Davey said the debate over shale gas has been marred by exaggeration and misunderstanding. "You would be forgiven for thinking that it represents a great evil; one of the gravest threats that has ever existed to the environment, to the health of our children and to the future of the planet.

"On the other side of the coin, you could have been led to believe that shale gas is the sole answer to all our energy problems ... Both of these position are just plain wrong...
(9 September 2013)
Link to report Potential Greenhouse Gas Emissions Associated with Shale Gas Extraction and Use

 

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