Building a world of
resilient communities.



Iraq War Colonial and About Oil, Says Turki

Prince Turki al-Faisal is the king's nephew and the former head of Saudi Intelligence.

The US-led invasion of Iraq was a colonial war and there were some in the United States who saw it as a means of getting their hands on Iraqi oil, Prince Turki Al-Faisal was quoted as saying yesterday.

The ambassador to Britain and Ireland told the Irish Independent newspaper Washington’s stated aims in going to war in Iraq masked a more cynical reality.

“No matter how exalted the aims of the US in that war, in the final analysis it was a colonial war very similar to the wars conducted by the ex-colonial powers when they went out to conquer the rest of the world...,” Prince Turki said.

“What we have heard from American sources (is that) they were there to remove the weapons of mass destruction which Saddam Hussein was supposed to have acquired.”

Saudi Arabia opposed the war despite tensions with Iraq since its 1990 invasion of Kuwait.

“What we read and hear from our commentators in America and sometimes congressional sources, if you remember going back a year ago, there was the issue of the oil reserves in Iraq and that in a year or two they would be producing so much oil in Iraq that, as it were, the war would pay for itself,” the envoy said.

“(This) indicated that there were those in America who were thinking in those terms of acquiring the natural resources of Iraq for America.” Prince Turki said US pledges to bring freedom and democracy to Iraq remained “still just aims.”

“The individual Iraqi, until he can actually declare that his government is truly representative of his wishes and aspirations must still consider himself occupied,” he said.

On the wider conflict in the Middle East, Prince Turki described Palestinian leader Yasser Arafat as “a living martyr”, persecuted by an Israel “that is ruthless and generally devoid of any human considerations (toward the Palestinians).”

The prince described Osama Bin Laden’s Al-Qaeda network as “not so much an organization as a cult with a cult leader and a cult philosophy...”

“One of the main drawbacks of the operations in Afghanistan is that Bin Laden has not been caught,” he said. “To bring Bin Laden to justice will go a long way to removing some of his mystique.”

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.


This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


As I step out on the porch before sunrise Thanksgiving morning, the air will …

The Shadows of the Cave

Some of us prefer sun and wind and depth and color to the play of shadows on …

Zarzalejo Futuro: future scenarios

What does it look like when Transition meets the 15M movement in the context …

Becoming Pattern Literate

The word “pattern” takes us over a vast territory.

Resilience Reflections with John Thackara

It’s taken me a long time to learn respect for the ways millions of …

A Review of Books 2 and 3 in the After Oil Science Fiction Anthology Series

This year saw the publication of not one, but two, more worthy additions to …

Sending Them a Message

If we want to “send a message to those who hate us,” here’s a new one: Come …