Building a world of
resilient communities.

Beliefs Matter: Resilience Reflections with Erik Lindberg

Beliefs matter. So do stories. My inspiration often comes from the written word, and I’ve long been interested in writers who revel in the complexity of beliefs, understand how adept humans are at self-deception, but nevertheless provide a useful roadmap.

One and Half Cheers for Bernie: Decision 2016 and the (Deep) Sustainability Agenda

Recently a friend asked me what I thought about Bernie Sanders, especially with issues of sustainability in mind.  This is my answer.

Moral Discomfort, Privilege, and the Politics of Air-Conditioning

As I learned in graduate-school, the legitimate fear of change and the unknown expressed in each case is, more significantly, working at the same time to protect some form of unacknowledged and unseen privilege. 

Six Myths About Climate Change that Liberals Rarely Question

Either you will continue to buy, use, and consume as if there is no tomorrow; or you will make substantial changes to the way you live.

Climate Crisis and the Pursuit of Happiness: Reflections on Community Solutions Conference

This last phrase has been sticking out in my mind all day--the pursuit of happiness, especially. 

Sufficient Liberal Stories--The Krugman Function Part 4

The introduction just of oil supply and carbon emissions into the liberal field of view pretty much undoes the main story told by mainstream Democrats today.  

The Infinite Toddler Regress--The Krugman Function Part 3

In this installment I’m going to talk about Paul Krugman’s resistance to whole-system thinking, and I’m going to do it by way of a comparison to a very different intellectual dispensation...

The Krugman Function, Part 2: Whole-System Thinking

Because of its emphasis on liberty, autonomy, free will, and consent, the Enlightenment tradition of Liberalism has, I will be arguing, in large part been based on the rejection of whole-system thinking.  

The Krugman Function

Fresh thinking is difficult to perform and is often poorly received, but is not without some pleasures as well.

Separating Gloom from Doom: A Post-Carbon Existentialism

This can be scary.   But even while considering the direst aspects of a world of increasing constraints and contractions, I don’t find the future to be the source of gloom.