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Articles: book review (17)

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Review: Star's Reach, Not the Future We Ordered, and Decline and Fall

It's to John Michael Greer's immense credit that his work examines aspects of our collective cultural life few others dare touch–and does so more deeply than anyone else's work does.

Review: A History of the Future by James Kunstler

In the category of thrilling fiction about our post-industrial future, James Howard Kunstler’s World Made By Hand novels have no equal.

Mr. Toad in Union Grove: Review of A History of The Future by James Howard Kunstler

The novel is an exploration of the process of rebuilding a broken civilization, even as the old continues to decay and collapse in both expected and unexpected ways.

Resilience Food Growing: A Multibook Review

 A look at four books which take different approaches to creating resilient food growing models.

Decline and Fall - Book Review

Very few people will read this book without bristling at least once at things Greer says...which I regard as one of its virtues.

The New Farmer’s Almanac

Like the Old Farmer’s Almanac, the New Farmer’s Almanac offers long range weather forecasts, full moon dates, sunrise and sunset times, best planting dates, crop advice, tides tables, riddles, games, recipes, songs, and folk wisdom.

Review: Snake Oil: how fracking's false promise of plenty imperils our future

For those who thought the 'fracking' issue was just about water pollution and earthquakes, Richard Heinberg's Snake Oilmight be a little perplexing.

Review: Paradise Lot

In practice, self-reliance can be harder than permaculture experts sometimes make it sound. This is where Eric Toensmeier’s 'Paradise Lot' comes in. Anyone who finds him or herself discouraged in their permaculture garden efforts should take heart and read this book.

Less is more, more or less

The basic tenet of the steady state economy (or SSE) is an observation that makes complete sense: you can’t have infinite growth in a finite system. Unfortunately, conventional economics – perhaps in an attempt to defy its characterization as the dismal science – says …

Economies should be shaped to suit man

Sacred Economics is a hugely ambitious book. It takes aim at the most basic intellectual and moral foundations of our modern industrial societies. The author, Charles Eisenstein, is fully aware that many of his arguments and proposals will seem naïve, utopian and hopelessly idealistic to …

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