Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

Community Food Activists Tell Their Stories

It’s easy to dismiss issues facing people we don’t know and don’t see. Out of sight, out of mind. And if we don’t know any people grappling with hunger, that crisis can seem very abstract.

To personalize it and make it more real, WhyHunger, which supports community-based organizations that seek solutions to underlying causes of hunger and connect people with quality food, has launched its storytelling project Community Voices.

Read the stories of individual leaders and communities who are on the front lines shaping the movement to alleviate food insecurity and build food justice in America. Photo credit: WhyHunger

Read the stories of individual leaders and communities who are on the front lines shaping the movement to alleviate food insecurity and build food justice in America. Photo credit: WhyHunger

WhyHungers mission is to “amplify the voices of the people working to regain control of their communities’ food.” WhyHunger says they believe that “telling one’s story is not only an act of reclaiming in the face of the dominant food narrative of this country, but also an affirmation that the small acts of food sovereignty happening across the country add up to a powerful, vital collective.”

Dozens of individuals, church groups, community groups and non-profits from across the country—California to Washington t0 Alabama to Minnesota to Pennsylvania—told their stories about what they’re doing to provide access to good food for people in their communities.

The Jones Valley Teaching Farm is training residents to turn blighted areas of Birmingham, Alabama into productive urban farms. Photo credit: WhyHunger

The Jones Valley Teaching Farm is training residents to turn blighted areas of Birmingham, Alabama into productive urban farms. Photo credit: WhyHunger

These stories have been collected, as part of a collaboration between WhyHunger, USDA’s Community Food Projects Competitive Grant Program, and writer and photographer, David Hanson.

Visit WhyHunger’s new storytelling website and read the stories of individuals and communities who are on the front lines shaping the movement to alleviate food insecurity and build food justice in America.

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


Nature's Way: A Path to Ecological Agriculture

Allen White and Wes Jackson explore a new agricultural paradigm that mimics …

A Floating Food Forest Prepares to Set Sail in New York City

Half public art project, half tourist destination, a floating food forest …

My Agricultural Grandparents

It is not uncommon for farmers to talk about the influence their …

City Centre Milking Parlour Provokes Discussion

Finding innovative ways to provoke discussion and engage people with where …

The Revolution will not be Market Gardenized: Some Thoughts on Jean-Martin Fortier

It was suggested to me recently that I might like to pen some thoughts on …

A Recipe for Change

In Cooked: A Natural History of Transformation, Michael Pollan describes his …

Seeds of Change  

Gary Nabhan has taken the fight to the corporate seed merchants through the …