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The Art of Hosting – Leadership is Possible from Everywhere



“The art of hosting is an approach to group leadership [which] creates spaces for us to be learning together… co-creating, teaching each other, offering our gifts.” Rather than seeing groups as hierarchical and with fixed roles, Art of Hosting practitioner Chris Corrigan sees groups as living systems — egalitarian, participatory, fluid, becoming tolerant of uncertainty in the inevitable dance between chaos and order. Dave Pollard describes how the GroupWorks card deck was developed to map patterns which groups may practice — like Holding Space, Guerrilla facilitation, or Curiosity. These are expressions of an evolving global community of practice who are “creating resilient learning spaces for dealing with complexity.”

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