Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

2013: The Year Bike Sharing Came of Age

Five million rides were taken on New York’s new bike share system in the first five months of service. (Photo courtesy of People for Bikes)

2013 is the year when the sharing economy—the recent rediscovery of the economic advantages of mutual cooperation—came to public attention.

It was also the year that bike sharing, one of the most tangible symbols of the sharing economy, came of age in America.

New bike sharing systems opened in New York, Chicago, San Francisco, Salt Lake City, Fort Worth, Columbus and Aspen, Colorado, this year while existing systems expanded in Minneapolis, Washington D.C. and other cities.

And 2014 is shaping up as the time when automated bike rental stations become commonplace on America’s streets, as bike sharing comes to Phoenix, Philadelphia, San Diego, Milwaukee, Tampa, Cincinnati, Seattle, Portland, Austin and Ann Arbor.

Skeptics predicted bike sharing would flop in New York City despite proven success in comparable places like Boston and Washington. They quickly quieted down after the Citi Bike system was launched in late May with 4300 bikes (now almost 6000) at more than 330 stations across Manhattan and Brooklyn.

Five million rides were logged in the first five months with no fatalities and only two dozen injuries, most of them minor. Ninety one percent of riders are so happy with the new system they want to use their federal tax dollars to expand it, according to a survey by Transportation Alternatives. (No public money has been invested in the system yet.) More than 90 percent of users also want to see Citi Bikes expand in their neighborhoods.

Another 4000 Citi Bikes will hit the streets of Manhattan and Brooklyn next year, which will make New York one of the largest bike sharing systems in the world after Paris and eight cities in China.

Chicago, however, also claims the title of America’s #1 bike sharing city based on the number of stations— 475 stations will be installed across the city by next year. The Windy City’s Divvy system opened last June with 750 bikes at 68 stations, and will expand to 4000 bikes next spring.

The Bay Area’s bike share system debuted in August with 700 bikes available in San Francisco, San Jose, Palo Alto and Mountain View. 2014 will see 1000 bikes at 100 stations.

Bike sharing experienced a few bumps in the road this year Los Angeles, set to open a downtown pilot program in 2013, abandoned plans due to a legal conflict about advertising on bike stations. The city is now looking to create a regional system. Meanwhile PBSC—the firm supplying bike sharing infrastructure for many systems including New York, Toronto and Washington—is on shaky financial ground, which might delay planned expansions in some cities and postpone bike sharing’s debut in Vancouver.

But even with these problems, Atlantic Cities blogger Sarah Goodyear writes, “In cities across the United States and Canada, bike-share has quickly proven its popularity.”

This is well-worth celebrating. Bike sharing offers people a healthier, more economical, greener way of travel that reduces traffic congestion for everyone, proven by a Washington DC survey showing that Capital Bike Share members drive 4.4 million fewer miles a year and save $800 in transportation costs on average.

And the bike sharing stations seen in more and more cities stand as a symbol that commons-based shared resources are the way of the future.

Adapted from a story from from People for Bikes

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


The Collapse of Western Civilization: Review

Collapse is a scenario of decline. The question is whether it is a useful one.

Connecting Placemaking and Resilience in New York’s Coastal Areas

A resilient place has traditionally been considered one that is capable of …

Resilience Roundup - Aug 28

China air pollution: Beijing records its cleanest air ever | Global sea …

Everything Gardens: Growing Transition Culture

Academic work on Transition can often be infuriating rather than illuminating.

A Willingness to Try Again: Resilience Reflections with Brian Miller

Anyone who farms experiences setbacks on a daily basis. That rate of failure …

Retrotopia: Dawn Train from Pittsburgh

This is the first of a series of posts using the tools of narrative fiction …

A Simpler Way: Crisis as Opportunity

A Simpler Way is a documentary about simple living, permaculture, and local …