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COMMUNITY RESILIENCE CHATS: "Rebuilding the Foodshed" with Philip Ackerman-Leist and Asher Miller


This webinar was recorded JUNE 26, 2013.

Want to start a community-owned café, solar array, or investment fund but don’t know where to start?

Transition US, the Post Carbon Institute, and Chelsea Green Publishing are partnering to bring you a series of webinars on the Community Resilience Guides, designed to provide community leaders with the tools they need to relocalize and transform our food, financial, and energy systems.

 
Rebuilding the Foodshed
Droves of people have turned to local food as a way to retreat from our   broken industrial food system. From rural outposts to city streets, they are sowing, growing, selling, and eating food produced close to home—and they are crying out for agricultural reform. All this has made "local food" into everything from a movement buzzword to the newest darling of food trendsters.
 
But now it's time to take the conversation to the next level. That's exactly what Philip Ackerman-Leist does in Rebuilding the Foodshed, in which he refocuses the local-food lens on the broad issue of rebuilding regional food systems that can replace the destructive aspects of industrial agriculture, meet food demands affordably and sustainably, and be resilient enough to endure potentially rough times ahead.
 
Changing our foodscapes raises a host of questions. How far away is local? How do you decide the size and geography of a regional foodshed? How do you tackle tough issues that plague food systems large and small—issues like inefficient transportation, high energy demands, and rampant food waste? How do you grow what you need with minimum environmental impact? And how do you create a foodshed that's resilient enough if fuel grows scarce, weather gets more severe, and traditional supply chains are hampered?
 
Showcasing some of the most promising, replicable models for growing, processing, and distributing sustainably grown food, this book points the reader toward the next stages of the food revolution. It also covers the full landscape of the burgeoning local-food movement, from rural to suburban to urban, and from backyard gardens to large-scale food enterprises.
 

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