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Transport - Sept 21

Click on the headline (link) for the full text.

Many more articles are available through the Energy Bulletin homepage

What would British roadsl look like if we treated them the same way we do our cycle lanes?

London Cycling Blog
Last week we posted a photo on our Facebook page of a truck blocking Cycle Superhighway 3.

It inspired LCC supporter Dave Hall to picture how our roads might look if we treated them with the same disregard we do our bike lanes.

(2 July 2012)
More images at source

Check Out This Great Bike-Sharing 'How To' Guide for U.S. Cities!

Michael Graham Richard, Treehugger
Urban Planners and Policymakers Take Note

The Federal Highway Administration (FHA) has done something really cool and released a kind of 'how to' guide for cities who are considering setting up a bike-sharing program. It's a fantastic idea and I must give kudos to all those involved! The best way for bike-sharing to succeed and spread like kudzu is for the best practices of existing programs to be transmitted to new entrants. Otherwise, if every new bike-share has to reinvent the wheel, progress will be slow and we'll see many failures. But if they can benefit from the collective wisdom and experience of others, we're well on our way.

Here's the guide: Bike Sharing in the United States: State of the Practice and Guide to Implementation (pdf)...
(11 September 2012)

Building walkable cities cuts emissions more than fuel taxes, study says

Claire Lambrecht, SmartPlanet
New Urbanists have advocated walkable cities and shorter commutes for years. But does investing in this approach — what behavioral economists call “smart growth” — simply look good on paper, or does it produce tangible results?

It does, according to a new study published in the B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis and Policy.

The study, conducted by Sudip Chattopadhyay and Emily Taylor of San Francisco State University, looked at the ways travel demand were impacted by the degree of “smart growth” in a given city. Their findings indicate that people are not as dependent on their cars as common wisdom might suggest. Instead, urban car use patterns are rather elastic. Just a 10 percent increase in “smart growth” amenities can reduce the number of annual vehicle miles traveled by 20 percent...
(16 September 2012)

World's Coolest Bus Commercial

Via Copenhagenize

(15 September 2012)

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