Building a world of
resilient communities.

MAIN LIST

 

Peak Oil, the Decline of the North Sea and Britain's Energy Future (report excerpt)

A paper to accompany the presentation to the All Party Parliamentary Group on Peak Oil, Tuesday 24th November 2009

We are so often told about the problems of climate change by the various political parties in Britain, but in fact the changing climate is just one of a number of factors that we will have to manage over the course of this century. If we take an ecological or biophysical perspective then we see that society faces a far wider set of problems to resolve as it adapts to the reality that growth within a finite environment has its limits. Such limits are not theoretical, and are being played out within our lives today under the guide of phenomena such as global food shortages, resource depletion or climate change.

These are global issues; in many cases they will require global solutions in order to create a satisfactory outcome for everyone on the planet. However, Britain has its own domestic problems related to the “ecology” of our past history in these islands: Britain was one of the first countries to industrialise, and we mined many of our natural resources as part of this effort; during the early 19th Century we were the “Saudi Arabia of coal”, exporting British coal around the world; more recently Britain has exploited the oil and gas reserves of the North Sea, and this has inarguably contributed to the the well-being of our economy for the past three decades. Today, this 250 year arc of economic and technical development has reached its zenith; the accelerating depletion of North Sea oil and gas production marks the point at which we must plan for the “downside” – and the inevitable decline in the easy availability of energy and material wealth that is the inevitable result of this transition. What's important is to ensure that as part of this process the “decline” of our ability to generate economic wealth from our material resources does not translate in a more general crisis in British society; we must learn to reap the benefits of our human assets rather than the geographic chance of possessing abundant natural resources...

Along with the PDF you can also download the slides of the presentation and background data.

Audio files will eventually be available via the APPGOPO web site: http://www.appgopo.org.uk/

Paul Mobbs, Mobbs' Environmental Investigations and Research
http://www.fraw.org.uk/mei/
mei@fraw.org.uk

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.

 

This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


Fracking and Health: What we Know from Pennsylvania's Gas Boom

Tensions between economic development, energy policy and environmental and …

Peak Oil Review: A Midweek Update - 24th Aug 2016

 A midweek update. It has been a volatile three days for oil with …

How We Went on an Energy Diet, and What We Lost (and Gained!)

In which I reveal the changes in our household energy usage from 2003 …

Five Billion Years of Energy Supply: the "Stereosphere" and the Upcoming Photovoltaic Revolution

Both the biosphere and the stereosphere use solar light as the energy …

Peak Oil Review - Aug 22 2016

 A weekly roundup of peak oil  news, including: -Oil and the …

Limitless imagination and physical limits

How do we distinguish those ideas that are forever going to remain in the …

Some Reflections on the Twilight of the Oil Age (part III)

The impact of the Tooth Fairy Syndrome is all the more felt in the main …