Building a world of
resilient communities.



Towards oil resilience

Australia is finding it difficult to access the quantities of oil that it needs at an affordable price. Demand for oil is not just coming from motorists. Farmers, miners and manufacturers are also competing for the same liquid gold that literally fuels our world.

The problem is the world is demanding more oil than it can produce. Additionally, many believe that the production of oil has—or is about to—peak.

Our State is experiencing the impacts of oil scarcity, along with our fellow Australians, our trading partners, our military allies, our regional neighbours and our friends and relations across the globe.

There is legitimate concern in many Queensland communities about the effects of an oil scarce future.

Queensland has a choice. We can either plan for an oil restricted world or we can become victims of the global market.

With an oil-resilience strategy, Queensland has the opportunity to set its own future. We must get ahead of the game by designing how we live and move around in an
oil-constrained world.

The Queensland Government does not want high oil prices to impact on the Queensland community’s capacity to travel, nor do we want our farms, mines and manufacturers to lose their competitive edge because they cannot get the necessary energy inputs.

This information paper considers what alternatives we can adopt, what other energy sources we can use, and what substitutes we can develop—so we can still have a happy
and prosperous Queensland population.

By expanding our options, we are spreading the risk and limiting the negative effects of oil scarcity and cost.

More options will reduce our dependence on large oil companies that demand even higher prices.

This information paper outlines how we can make lifestyle choices that can improve our quality of life.

So please have a read and consider what changes you and the Queensland Government can make to prepare for an oil-resilient future.

Editorial Notes: Contributor Stuart writes: Andrew McNamara, now the Queensland Minister for Suatainability, Climate Change and Innovation, has been at the forefront of the peak oil debate for several years. Above is his foreword in a community information paper supporting the development of the Queensland Government's Oil Vulnerability Mitigation Strategy and Action Plan. The accompanying research paper is here - (PDF). The submission deadline is 17 October 2008. Queensland is on track to become the first state/provincial constituency in the world to proactively develop a peak oil mitigation plan. UPDATE (Sept 16). EB contributor Michael Lardelli points out that the page Oil vulnerability mitigation at the Queensland government site has "various papers etc relevant to peak oil and how Queensland plans to cope" (work by McNamara)

What do you think? Leave a comment below.

Sign up for regular Resilience bulletins direct to your email.

Take action!  

Find out more about Community Resilience. See our COMMUNITIES page
Start your own projects. See our RESOURCES page.
Help build resilience. DONATE NOW.


This is a community site and the discussion is moderated. The rules in brief: no personal abuse and no climate denial. Complete Guidelines.


The "Syrian Sickness": What Crude Oil Gives, Crude Oil will Take Away

Crude oil had created modern Syria, crude oil has destroyed it.

Drought Influenced Syrian Civil War; So What, Says U.S. Congress

This singular thought, that climate change can stir dangerous human …

Peak Oil Review - Nov 23

A weekly roundup of peak oil news, including: -Quote of the Week -Oil and …

Despite Low Oil Prices, Renewable Power Gaining Traction, Energy Agencies Report — But Not Yet Fast Enough for the Climate

The shift away from coal and towards renewable sources of energy is slowly …

Peak Oil Notes - Nov 19

 A midweek update.Oil futures fell as low as $39.91 a barrel in New …

Keeping warm with minimal heating: small-scale solutions

I discuss some of the ways you can add the equivalent of an extra layer of …

Can We Afford the Future?

As a child of the 1950s I grew up immersed in a near-universal expectation …