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Renewables - Mar 12

Click on the headline (link) for the full text.

Many more articles are available through the Energy Bulletin homepage

Solar power station lift-off

Michael Owen and Cara Jenkin, Adelaide Advertiser
ADELAIDE Airport will have the second-largest rooftop solar plant in Australia when work finally starts this week.

Adelaide Airport Limited will today announce the largest commercial solar installation contract in South Australia.

... BP Solar regional director Brooke Miller yesterday said the panels would be located in the middle of the Terminal 1 roof, directly above the main concourse, and would be highly visible from the air. ``Whether you are from overseas or interstate, when you fly into Adelaide the first impression you will receive is of a state that is doing its utmost to ensure that solar power is a part of our energy future,'' she said.
(9 March 2008)
Contributor SP writes:
Although I think it's a reasonable idea, I can't help noting the disconnect, especially in the last paragraph:

when you fly into Adelaide the first impression you will receive is of a state that is doing its utmost to ensure that solar power is a part of our energy future

Granted, Adelaide is pretty isolated.

Pollution Is Called a Byproduct of a ‘Clean’ Fuel

Brenda Goodman, New York Times
MOUNDVILLE, Ala. - After residents of the Riverbend Farms subdivision noticed that an oily, fetid substance had begun fouling the Black Warrior River, which runs through their backyards, Mark Storey, a retired petroleum plant worker, hopped into his boat to follow it upstream to its source.

It turned out to be an old chemical factory that had been converted into Alabama’s first biodiesel plant, a refinery that intended to turn soybean oil into earth-friendly fuel.

“I’m all for the plant,” Mr. Storey said. “But I was really amazed that a plant like that would produce anything that could get into the river without taking the necessary precautions.”
(11 March 2008)

Corn-based ethanol could worsen "dead zone"

Deborah Zabarenko, Reuters
Growing more corn to meet the projected U.S. demand for ethanol could worsen an expanding "dead zone" in the Gulf of Mexico that is bad for crawfish, shrimp and local fisheries, researchers reported on Monday.

The dead zone is a huge area of water -- some 7,700 square miles -- that forms above the continental shelf of the Gulf of Mexico every summer. It contains very low levels of oxygen.

The dead zone starts in Midwestern corn country when farmers fertilize their fields with nitrogen
(11 March 2008)

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