Kunstler novel coming next year
Peak oil, Transition Towns and resilience building.

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Solutions & sustainability - Sept 20

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Many more articles are available through the Energy Bulletin homepage


"What a Way to Go" - Meet the Filmmakers
(Audio and Video)
Peak Moment via Global Public Media

pm72_120.jpg Tim Bennett and Sally Erickson discuss the influences behind this heartfelt and riveting documentary on "Life at the End of Empire." Framed in Tim's personal story of awakening to the big global issues threatening everyone's survival. It will touch you and make you think. Episode 72.

Janaia Donaldson hosts Peak Moment, a television series emphasizing positive responses to energy decline and climate change through local community action. How can we thrive, build stronger communities, and help one another in the transition from a fossil fuel-based lifestyle?
(17 September 2007)


Kunstler novel coming next year

Megan Sullivan, Bookdwarf
I finished a book late last night which even though is not coming out until next March I wanted to go ahead and mention. Did you know that James Howard Kunstler wrote fiction? I didn't. I know him from The Long Emergency and The Geography of Nowhere.

...Grove Atlantic has this lovely novel by Kunstler called World Made by Hand. Imagine a more personal, less post apocalyptic and dark version of The Road (sorry, the comparison will be inevitable). Set decades in the future, the oil has finally run out and catastrophe after catastrophe has broken apart the world. But it's not full of roaming bands of catamites and Mad Max-esque thugs. Small towns have gone back to the old ways of living off the land without electricity and machines.

I found it fascinating partly because the author does such a good job of keeping it realistic. Whereas The Road invokes an epic struggle ala The Odyssey, World Made by Hand brings to mind Hesiod's Works and Days. I found it absorbing and difficult to put down.
(13 September 2007)


Peak Oil, Transition Towns and Resilience Building.
My Talk to the IFG Teach In.

Rob Hopkins, Transition Culture
My presentation to the IFG Teach In runs for 15 minutes and is divided into 3 sections. You can see them below. I think we ought to do a lot more sending DVDs of talks to conferences and staying at home. Perhaps we should see conferences as being more like the Oscars, a talk, a filmed greeting, some music, another film and another talk. Keep the media changing. Anyway, this is my attempt. If you were at the conference, did it work? ...

Part Two
Part Three
(14 September 2007)
Nice overview of what Transition Towns are about. As Rob mentions, the idea seems to have gone viral.

Perhaps the most impressive part of Rob's message is the fact that he opted to send a video presentation, rather than fly to the conference. He's right - somehow we've got to find a better way to exchange information and establish relationships. -BA

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