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Democratic Wealth: Building a Citizens' Economy

'Democratic Wealth' is a collection of essays that challenges the poverty of thinking around economic policy, particularly after the 2007 financial crash. It explores the renewed interest in republicanism and suggests this as a framework to shape an economy that serves the common good. It is a selection of articles from a series published by openDemocracy and Politics in Spires, a blog run by the universities of Oxford and Cambridge.

The book is split into three parts. The first, Taking Back the Economy, features contributions from Philip Pettit, Thad Williamson, Joe Guinan, Jessica Kimpell and others on republican thinking and the market. The second, Republican Economy in Practice, looks at application around the globe, including contributions on cooperatives, sovereign wealth funds, basic income, tax fairness and green solutions and discusses how to develop these models at scale. In the third, Republican Politics, contributors including Quentin Skinner, Alex Gourevitch and Karma Nabulsi discuss the politics of republicanism, from challenging  the surveillance state to democratising the workplace and harnessing the demands of new social movements for freedom from domination by the one per cent. It ends with an afterword by James Meadway, senior economist at nef, on clearing a path for a better future.
 
‘...as regards wealth, ... no citizen should be rich enough to be able to buy another, and none so poor that he has to sell himself...’    -  Jean-Jacques Rousseau, Social Contract
 
AVAILABLE for FREE:

1. On Scribd (scroll down)

2. On Smashwords here as an interactive PDF and .epub file. .epub files can be read on various e-readers such as Calibre, and can be instantly converted to .mobi files through services like this one and read on a Kindle reader.
 
N.B. We were unable to offer the book on Amazon Kindle as we are committed to the book being absolutely free, and Amazon requires a minimum charge.
 

This e-book is the product of an editorial partnership between openDemocracy and Politics in Spires. To read more about our editorial partnerships, click here

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